EXPLORE SRI LANKA

From tropical, soft-sand beaches and warm inviting seas, a four hour journey by road or rail leads to breath taking mountain scenery, tea covered slopes and temperate climes in the south central hills; to the proud immensity of historical Ancient Cities once metropolises of great civilizations; to fabled mines of sapphires and ruby, moonstone and topaz; or to Game parks rich in wildlife. 
All along the way are rustic villages, exotic flora, panoramic views, temples and sanctuaries, cottage industries and traditional arts and crafts centres; the unique way to life of people whose charm is irresistible. 

Ahungalle

Ahungalla is 93 km away from Colombo (Southern Expy) also it will take approximately 2 hours drive time. It is one of the specific beaches in Sri Lanka. One can engage in various activities. It is also well known for its multitude of turtles that swim on the coast. All along the street-side you will witness vendors who sell from anything to everything such as fruits, vegetables and intricate masks.

What to do/see in & around Ahungalla,

• “Brief” Garden- It was Bevis Bawa, brother of Geoffrey Bawa, who converted this former rubber plantation into a wonderful landscaped garden.

• Whale watching- Mirissa is one of best places to see whales in the world. You can see number of Blue whales, Sperm whales & dolphins in a few nautical miles off the Mirissa area.

• Madu Ganga river safari- while on tour you can see a variety of species of endemic. It is home to about 303 species of plants and 248 species of vertebrate animals.

• Ambalangoda masks- the traditional masks are carved from light Balsa like Kaduru wood. Masks are used for several purposes in Sri Lanka such as featuring in traditional dance, drama and comedies, and in large pageants and processions, they are also used in ceremonies to exorcise demons or cure illnesses.

• Hot air balloon trip- optional

Anuradhapura

Time required: If possible, reserve a full day for your visit!

Anuradhapura, was the great ancient monastic city of Sri Lankan civilization and royal capital of 113 successive kings (and four queens) for over a millennium! At its height it was home to thousands of monks and a population of nearly two million. Its Buddhist culture and architectural achievements made it famous across Asia, while even today the sheer scale of its surviving ruins and stupas is breathtaking. Besides the amazing architecture, the freedom of worship, the world’s first hospitals, the most impressive achievement was in irrigation! The tanks ( wewa) and reservoirs built to catch the monsoon rains and to supply water to the paddy fields are still in use today. In 1073 AD Anuradhapura was abandoned and forgotten and Polonnarua became the new capital. Finally in the 19th century, British explorers have rediscovered the “lost city” with its magnificent dagobas, palaces, temples and shrines.

The Sri Maha Bodhi, possibly the oldest tree in the world is more than 2000 years old and is the spiritual and physical center of the city. It is said to be a sapling of the original tree under which Buddha attained enlightenment. On the monthly full moon day ( poya), thousands of Sri Lankas flock to the site. The tree today is supported by crutches and protected by a golden railing with hundreds of colorful flags flying in its branches. Near to the tree the 1,600 pillars of the Brazen Palace are what is left of this once magnificent building. The gigantic Jetavanarama Stupa (122m), the Ruwanweliseya (55m), the Abhayagiri Monastery, the Samadhi Buddha, the twin ponds, the Isurumuniya Temple and the king’s palace are only some of the main attractions not to be missed. The Anuradhapura Museum and the Folk Museum are showing some curious exhibits.

What to do/see around Anuradhapura:

Visit the Aukana Buddha
Yapahuwa- the magnificent citadel is built on a huge granite rock, 100m above the plains. located 60km south of Anuradhapura
Go for a ride on an elephant’s back through the jungle near Habarana
Safari at Minneriya National Park
Anuradhapura is part of the so-called “Cultural Triangle” , together with Dambulla, Polonnaruwa, Sigiriya and Mihintale.
Anuradhapura is also the gateway to north – the Jaffna peninsula and the east coast – Trincomalee.

Arugam Bay

At the southern end of the East Coast lies the little village of Arugam Bay, famously known as one of ten top surf spots in the world. A popular tourist destination and home to a mix of Tamils, Sinhalese, Muslims and some expat Europeans, a good place to chill out and completely relax, being a long way from anywhere else! The relatively isolated beaches here and a simple, laid-back lifestyle away from the main tourist spots attract surfing enthusiasts from all over the world. The best time for surfing in Arugam Bay is in July and August when the swells are high. Nowadays an increasing number of non –surfers are also visiting the place. The beach itself is pleasant, there are plenty of activities to keep you busy. Various guesthouses and a few basic hotels provide modest accommodation and rustic beach side restaurants and charming bars provide cool drinks, fresh sea-food and a relaxed atmosphere.

What to do/see around Arumgam Bay

Forest hermitage at Kudimbigala, once hundreds of Buddhist monks lived in the caves
Village of Okanda, home to the largest Hindu temple on the coast
Excursion to YalaEast national Park or Lahugala National park
Best Surfing conditions in July and August
Enjoy the freshest sea food and local specialties
Watch the sun rise over the ocea

Aukana

The village of Aukana is located off Kekirawa on the route between Dambulla and Anuradhapura. The Buddha statue is the most perfectly preserved ancient statue in Sri Lanka and stands near the Kala wewa tank, created by king Dhatusena in the 5th century. The Buddha itself is probably dating from three or four centuries later. The elegant statue of the “sun eating” Buddha is 12m high and is in the unusual “asisa mudra”, the blessing position.A copy of it can be seen in Colombo, opposite the BMICH conference hall, next to the Chinese Embassy.

What to do/see around Aukana

Yapahuwa- the magnificent citadel is built on a huge granite rock, 100m above the plains. located 60km south of Anuradhapura and 25km from Aukana
Go for a ride an elephant back through the jungle near Habarana
Safari at Minneriya National Park
Aukana is part of the so-called “Cultural Triangle” , together with Anuradhapura, Dambulla, Polonnaruwa, Sigiriya and Mihintale, pls. refer separate info!

Batticaloa

The beautiful, yet quiet and undisturbed East Coast, that had suffered much during the many years of civil war in the island is now receiving the well deserved attention and development. The climate is opposite to that of the west coast. During May to October, when the monsoon hits the west, the sun mostly shines in the east. The population here is predominantly Tamil and Muslim, in the west it’s mostly Sinhalese. The climate and vegetation is also different

120km south of Trinco, Batticaloa is an appealing, but lesser known town, waiting to be explored. Historically it is known as the place where the Dutch first landed in Sri Lanka (in 1602). The solid fort has withstood the civil war and the tsunami.

What to do/see when at the Batticaloa
Pasikudah bay – new tourist resort with many up-market & luxury hotels
Excursion to Batticaloa- Kallady bridge, fort, Batticaloa gate & lagoon, boat tour

Bundala

Bundala is one of the best destinations for birdwatchers. It is located around 15km east of Hambantota at the southern coast of Sri Lanka and is home to crocodiles, turtles, even elephants and other fauna. The park encloses 5 shallow lagoons, separated by scrubby forest running down to coastal dunes. The lagoons attract an amazing variety of aquatic birds, including pelicans, egrets, storks, ibis and of course flamingos.

Colombo

History & information

Colombo has been a settlement of Muslim seafarers, who established a small trading post in the 8th century. “Kolamba” however remained rather unimportant until the Portuguese arrived in the 16th century. In 1517 they started to build a fort, from where they launched their conquest of the island. From 1656 the Dutch ousted the Portugese and expanded the fortifications ; new suburbs and an extensive canal system were built. Finally in 1796 , Colombo fell to the British and in 1815 Colombo was declared the capital of Ceylon. Sri Lanka re-gained independence in 1948.

The modern city of today, with a population of around 3 million, has grown into a bustling metropolis , expanding for over 40km from north to south along the western coast of Sri Lanka. The fascinating contrast between its fading colonial charm and its modern face with soaring apartment towers and new hotels being built one after the other, is waiting to be discovered by the interested traveler. The city’s population is a mix of cultures, with Tamil, Muslim and Burgher communities and well as a considerable number of expats adding to the predominant Singhalese majority.

Start your city tour in the oldest part, the Fort , from the Dutch hospital shopping complex, which is the oldest remaining building, dating from 1684. Turn into York Street and view the lighthouse clock-tower in Chatham Street, Victorian buildings, the GHO, Grand Oriental Hotel and the Gordon Gardens, General Post office and the president’s house, which is however still cordoned off. From here it’s only a few minutes on foot or by Tuk-Tuk taxi to the Pettah, a tumultuous bazaar district, displaying the city’s vibrant commercial life. Narrow streets are lined with countless shops, stuffed with every imaginable type of merchandise. The most striking building , the red & white Jami-ul-Alfar Mosque from 1909, the Dutch period Museum, the Wolvendaal Church, built by the Dutch in 1749 and the various Hindu Kovils are well worth a visit!

The Galle Face Green is the city’s seafront esplanade running between the Galle Face Hotel in the south and the neoclassical Secretariat in the north. The Green attracts huge crowds of locals, especially after dusk and during week-ends, a place to meet friends, fly kites, play a game of cricket and grab a drink & bite from one of the many food-carts along the oceanfront.

The so-called Slave Island was once completely surrounded by the Beira Lake and stocked with crocodiles to prevent the slaves from escaping in the night. Today the lake area has been renovated and cleaned and you could take a boat ride here. The unusual Seema Malaka temple is built on a wooden platform on top of the water and belongs to the well-know Gangaramaya Buddhist temple complex just across the main road. Visit the temple’s resident elephant, feasting on some palm leaves just next to the entrance.

The elegant white colonial National Museum of 1877 gives an overview of the history of the island from prehistoric times and contains the regalia of the last king of Kandy and various other treasures. On the opposite side of the Vihara Maha Devi park, the city’s green lung, you find Town Hall, which has just been beautifully renovated, a copy of the Capitol building in Washington DC. Not far away are the Independence Hall, the Bandaranaike Memorial International Conference Hall -BMICH, opposite the Chinese embassy and a copy of the Aukana Buddha.

Shopping:
Colombo offers a wide variety of shops, outlets and new department stores with a wide selection of souvenir and gift items, local handicraft, shoes, clothes, books, sports gear and much more.

Wining & dining:
The town also offers numerous restaurants and eating places for every taste and palate: from Indian to Chinese, Japanese to German, Italian to Thai and of course, delicious Sri Lankan rice & curry!

What to do /see in & around Colombo
Explore Pettah and visit the Dutch period Museum, Wolvendaal church
Visit the Buddhist temples , Hindu Kovils and churches
Kelaniya Raja Maha Vihara, 10km north-east, Colombo’s most important Buddhist shrine
Climb the Sambodhi Chaitiya Stupa for a beautiful view of the harbor
Have tea or a drink at the Grand Oriental Hotel’s harbor room
Painting exhibition and art fair on Green Path, along the Vihara Maha Devi Park on weekends
Sunday Jazz at “Barefoot” shop gardens, in Bambalapitiya
Lionel Wendt theatre & art centre
Geoffrey Bawa’s house, 33rd Lane, Kollupitiya, former residence of Sri Lanka’s most famous architect
Sundowner at Galle Face Hotel, the oldest colonial hotel in Asia, established in 1864
Seafood dinner at the Beach Wadiya Restaurant in Wellawatta
Play golf at the Royal Colombo Golf Club
Dehiwala Zoo, 10km south of the Fort, open daily, home to a wide range of Asian, African And South American wildlife, with the infamous elephant dance performance every afternoon.
Suburb of Mount Lavinia, 11 km south and the Mount Lavinia Hotel, a colonial landmark and former residence of the British Governor Sir Thomas Maitland, dating back to 1806

Dambulla

Located at the heart of the Cultural Triangle, the town of Dambulla is famous for its remarkable cave temples – five magical, dimly lit caves of different sizes, decorated with some of the finest murals and beautifully carved statues, offering an overview of Buddhist art. The caves date back to the reign of king Vattagamini Abhaya, 1st century BC. Nissankamalla, the last king of Polonnaruwa (12th century) and several later Kandyan kings ( 17th and 18th centuries) have embellished and adorned the interiors of the caves with murals, that are still visible today. Cave # 2 is the biggest and most spectacular, measuring 50m in length and a height of 7m. The rock is elevated 160m above the surrounding plains, offering stunning views, including Sigiriya in the distance. It is reached by climbing up the concrete steps, watched by troops of cheeky macaque monkeys, begging visitors for food.

At the bottom of the steps the Golden temple with a 30m golden Buddha on top houses the temple museum.

What to do/see around Dambulla:

Visit Nalanda Gedige, small stone temple in south Indian style, marking the centre of Sri Lanka!
See a spice garden around Matale, the centre of the spice growing industry of the island
Monastery of Aluvihare- of great significance in the history of Buddhism -“tripitaka”
Popham Arboretum, 3km east along the Kandelama Road, reforesting experiment of 1960, guided walks
Matale – Sri Muthumariamman Hindu Kovil, situated next to the main road
Yapahuwa- the magnificent citadel is built on a huge granite rock, 100m above the plains. located 60km south of Anuradhapura
Go for a ride on an elephant’s back through the jungle near Habarana
Safari at Minneriya National Park
Dambulla is part of the so-called “Cultural Triangle”, together with Anuradhapura, Polonnaruwa, Sigiriya and Mihintale.

Galle

Galle is magical. The most perfectly preserved colonial town in Sri Lanka and a piece of living history. Over the past view years, Galle has become one of the island’s most vibrant and cosmopolitan cities, as a sizable influx of European expats have moved into the old Dutch fort. Foreigners have bought up and renovated the neglected properties , streets and sidewalks have been newly paved and lots of boutique hotels and smart shops have opened up , giving some international flair to the formerly sleepy town. Galle’s main attraction is the 17th century Dutch Fort, a UNESCO protected World Heritage site.
The principal entrance to the Fort is through the Main Gate, one of the newest parts, added by the British is 1873. The Dutch had substantially enlarged the original Portuguese fortifications and the entire fort easily withstood the 2005 Tsunami and protected some of the new town. The best way to explore the Fort is on foot, walking down Leyn Baan Street towards the lighthouse and from there along the ramparts back through Pedlar Street to the point of origin. Little restaurants, cafes and shops offer meals and refreshments. Avoid the midday heat.
What to do/see in & around GALLE

Galle National & Maritime Museum
Annual Galle Literary festival, in January, founded in 2007
Afternoon tea at Amangalla Hotel, the former residence of the Dutch governor, dating from 1684, earlier known as New Oriental Hotel ( 1863)
Meeran Jumma Mosque and All Saint’s & Dutch reformed churches
Historical Mansion Museum, Leyn Baan Street, interesting collection of antiques, coins & junk
Galle International Cricket Stadium, new town, just outside the fort
Train ride to Hikkaduwa or Colombo from Galle main train station
Excursion to Bundala and YALA National Parks
Kataragama -holy site held sacred by Buddhits, Muslims and Hindus alike, colorful poojas
Whale-watching in Mirissa, during the season
Mulkirigala Cave temple
Boat tour on the Koggala lake
Dondra Head lighthouse, the southernmost point of the island,
Sinharaja Rainforest
Destinations . Daily Departures

Galle

Galle is magical. The most perfectly preserved colonial town in Sri Lanka and a piece of living history. Over the past view years, Galle has become one of the island’s most vibrant and cosmopolitan cities, as a sizable influx of European expats have moved into the old Dutch fort. Foreigners have bought up and renovated the neglected properties , streets and sidewalks have been newly paved and lots of boutique hotels and smart shops have opened up , giving some international flair to the formerly sleepy town. Galle’s main attraction is the 17th century Dutch Fort, a UNESCO protected World Heritage site.
The principal entrance to the Fort is through the Main Gate, one of the newest parts, added by the British is 1873. The Dutch had substantially enlarged the original Portuguese fortifications and the entire fort easily withstood the 2005 Tsunami and protected some of the new town. The best way to explore the Fort is on foot, walking down Leyn Baan Street towards the lighthouse and from there along the ramparts back through Pedlar Street to the point of origin. Little restaurants, cafes and shops offer meals and refreshments. Avoid the midday heat.
What to do/see in & around GALLE

Galle National & Maritime Museum
Annual Galle Literary festival, in January, founded in 2007
Afternoon tea at Amangalla Hotel, the former residence of the Dutch governor, dating from 1684, earlier known as New Oriental Hotel ( 1863)
Meeran Jumma Mosque and All Saint’s & Dutch reformed churches
Historical Mansion Museum, Leyn Baan Street, interesting collection of antiques, coins & junk
Galle International Cricket Stadium, new town, just outside the fort
Train ride to Hikkaduwa or Colombo from Galle main train station
Excursion to Bundala and YALA National Parks
Kataragama -holy site held sacred by Buddhits, Muslims and Hindus alike, colorful poojas
Whale-watching in Mirissa, during the season
Mulkirigala Cave temple
Boat tour on the Koggala lake
Dondra Head lighthouse, the southernmost point of the island,
Sinharaja Rainforest
Destinations . Daily Departures

Galle

Galle is magical. The most perfectly preserved colonial town in Sri Lanka and a piece of living history. Over the past view years, Galle has become one of the island’s most vibrant and cosmopolitan cities, as a sizable influx of European expats have moved into the old Dutch fort. Foreigners have bought up and renovated the neglected properties , streets and sidewalks have been newly paved and lots of boutique hotels and smart shops have opened up , giving some international flair to the formerly sleepy town. Galle’s main attraction is the 17th century Dutch Fort, a UNESCO protected World Heritage site.
The principal entrance to the Fort is through the Main Gate, one of the newest parts, added by the British is 1873. The Dutch had substantially enlarged the original Portuguese fortifications and the entire fort easily withstood the 2005 Tsunami and protected some of the new town. The best way to explore the Fort is on foot, walking down Leyn Baan Street towards the lighthouse and from there along the ramparts back through Pedlar Street to the point of origin. Little restaurants, cafes and shops offer meals and refreshments. Avoid the midday heat.
What to do/see in & around GALLE

Galle National & Maritime Museum
Annual Galle Literary festival, in January, founded in 2007
Afternoon tea at Amangalla Hotel, the former residence of the Dutch governor, dating from 1684, earlier known as New Oriental Hotel ( 1863)
Meeran Jumma Mosque and All Saint’s & Dutch reformed churches
Historical Mansion Museum, Leyn Baan Street, interesting collection of antiques, coins & junk
Galle International Cricket Stadium, new town, just outside the fort
Train ride to Hikkaduwa or Colombo from Galle main train station
Excursion to Bundala and YALA National Parks
Kataragama -holy site held sacred by Buddhits, Muslims and Hindus alike, colorful poojas
Whale-watching in Mirissa, during the season
Mulkirigala Cave temple
Boat tour on the Koggala lake
Dondra Head lighthouse, the southernmost point of the island,
Sinharaja Rainforest
Destinations . Daily Departures

Jaffna

The North is a world away from the rest of Sri Lanka and closer to southern India than to Colombo. From 1983 to 2009 the entire region was engulfed in the civil war between the rebel guerillas, LTTE, and the Sri Lankan Army and the years of fighting have further reinforced the 2000 year history of difference, that separates the Tamil north from the Sinhalese south.

For the interested traveler and repeat traveler, Sri Lanka’s final frontier is now ready to be discovered. It is still quite a distance by road, via Anuradhapura, Vavuniya, Mankulam and Kilinochchi, but various flight options from the capital are also available.

Jaffna is a fascinating town, with a great mixture of colonial charm and vibrant Tamil culture. The Jaffna peninsula and the surrounding islands offer a string of remote temples, beaches and attractions. The huge Wilpattu National Park, bordering the so –called Vanni district is now also open to visitors, a good alternative to the busy Yala park.

Jaffna is the largest town in the north and undisputed capital of the Sri Lankan Tamils. You can’t fail to notice the Indian influence here, exemplified by the replacement of the Buddhist dagoda with the Hindu gopuram.

What to do/see in and around Jaffna

Jaffna Fort, the largest Dutch Fort in Asia, built in the characteristic star shape
Jaffna Public Library – the original library was torched during the riots in 1981 and much of the great collection was destroyed
Jaffna clock tower, the tall tower is an unusual mix of Islamic and Gothic styles
Nallur Kandaswamy temple – Jaffna’s famous and most impressive Hindu temple
Excursions to Nagadeepa island, Casurina Beach or Delft island
Point Pedro lighthouse – marks the northern most point of the island
Vallipuram, a village 5km south of Point Pedro, is home to the second largest temple, dedicated to Lord Vishnu, who according to legend appeared in form of a fish!
Nilavarai well, bottomless well, 8km outside Jaffna on the way to Point pedro

Kandy

In the history of Sri Lanka, the Kingdom of Kandy retains an almost legendary place. Hidden away amid the green hills and looped by Sri Lanka’s largest river: the Mahaweli. The last independent stronghold of the Sinhalese , the Kingdom of Kandy clung to its freedom long after the rest of the island had fallen to the Portuguese and the Dutch, preserving its customs and culture, until finally having to surrender in 1815. The city remains a bastion of Sinhalese culture and religion and is home to the nation’s most revered Buddhist temple, the Dalada Maligawa, the sacred temple of the tooth relic. Kandy is also the undisputed centre for arts and crafts and home of the famous Kandyan dancers.

The town’s moderate climate and central location has made it a favorite for locals and foreign travelers alike. It is also the natural gateway to the stirring peaks of Sri Lanka’s hill country and to the great beaches in the east coast, near Tricomalee and Batticaloa. The Royal temple complex , of which the temple of the tooth was just one part, includes the Audience hall, the National & the Archaeological Museum and the Queen’s bath house ( ulpenge) just by the lakeside. During the month of July/August, Kandy dazzles with the sounds and lights of the Esala Perahera, a festival held over 10 days. A magnificent procession of caparisoned elephants, accompanied by dancers, drummers and many other performers, all following the Maligawa Tusker, the majestic male elephant, carrying the relic casket on his back.

What to do/see in and around Kandy

Peradeniya Botanical Gardens – one of the finest in Asia, dating back to the 14th century
The Temple of the sacred tooth relic and the tusker museum next door
Kandyan dance and drummers performance/firewalk – folklore show , daily, late afternoon
A stroll around the Kandy lake
Drive on the scenic route on Rajapahila Mawatha for a great view of the town
The National & Archaeological Museum behind the temple of the tooth
Visit a batik factory and learn the secrets of manufacturing a genuine batik
Udawattekele Sanctuary – walk through the forested hillside with imposing trees , birdlife and lots of monkeys. Walking distance from the town.
Tea Museum in Hantana – housed in an old, converted factory, the story of James Taylor
Walk the three temples loop or have your driver take you – Lanka Thilekke Vihara, The Embekke temple, known for its magnificent carved wooden pillars and the Gadaladeniya Vihara, which is built on a hilltop in the 14th century. All three temples are pre-dating the city of Kandy itself
Trekking in the Knuckles mountain range with an experienced guide

Mihintale

Mihintale, ( literally Mahinda’s hill) 12km east of Anuradhapura, is the birthplace of Buddhism in Sri Lanka. Mahinda, the son of the great Buddhist emperor Ashoka of India was sent by his father to bring Buddha’s teachings to Sri Lanka. In 247 BC he met and converted king Devanampiyatissa, while he was hunting a stag in the hills of Mihintale. It is one of the very important pilgrimage sites of the island, especially during Poson Poya ( June), which commemorates the introduction of Buddhism to Sri Lanka. The ruins and dagobas , set in the rocky hills, are linked by flights of stone steps ( 1850 in total!) and shaded by trees.

It is recommended to visit early morning or late afternoon, when the heat of the day as well as the crowds have gone.
It is recommended to visit early morning or late afternoon, when the heat of the day as well as the crowds have gone.
What to do/see around Mihintale

Visit the Aukana Buddha
Go for a ride an elephant back through the jungle near Habarana
Safari at Minneriya National Park
Mihintale is part of the so-called “Cultural Triangle” , together with Dambulla, Polonnaruwa, Sigiriya and Anuradhapura
Mihintale is located on the A12 route to Trincomalee, east of Anuradhapura

Minneriya & Kaudulla

These two parks are within half an hour’s drive of each other in the North Central Province, sited around two large reservoirs. Scrub jungle surrounds the lakes and contains many mammals, but game viewing is generally poor – except for the wonderful seasonal congregation of elephants. The ‘gathering’ takes place in Minneriya during September and October, when over 200 elephants come together on the bed of Minneriya Lake, which dries out to create a lush grassland.

Nuwara Eliya

The southern hill country is the highest, wildest and in many ways the most beautiful region of Sri Lanka. The journey from Kandy to Nuwara Eliya is simply spectacular. The newly renovated road winds upwards through hairpin bends, passing magnificent waterfalls, lush green tea estates and offers stunning views at every turn over the vast countryside.
Nuwara Eliya, the highest town of the island, lies in the heart of the hill country. It is situated at the foothills of the Pidurutalagala, at 2524m the highest mountain of the island! The “city above the clouds”, as it is often referred to , represents “Little England”, a Victorian relic, with a park, lake, colonial hotels and quaint old bungalows, the race course and of course the hilly 18-hole golf course right in the centre of it!
The sleepy village was “discovered” by some British officers in 1826 and subsequently developed into a retreat for the sick, due to the cool, pleasant climate. After exploring the highlands and clearing the thick forest, coffee plantations were established but soon got devastated by a virus. This disaster lead to experimenting with tea growing, the moderate climate proving ideal and the project was a success! So the world famous Ceylon tea was born. Visit a tea factory en route and purchase some fresh black tea, the perfect souvenir.

What to do/see when in & around Nuwara Eliya

Visit a tea factory and learn the process of tea making!
Train journey from Kandy to the hill country
Hakgala Botanical Gardens, established in 1860, just a few kilometers outside town
Sita Amman Kovil , a hindu temple associated with the Ramayana epic
Horton Plains National Park and World’s End, a windswept plateau at 2000 meters, the misty landscape and fauna will remind you of the “Jurassic Park” movie.
A round of golf at the Nuwara Eliya Golf Club
Hiking and walking in the region
Destinations . Daily Departures